ISU halts use of dogs in life support training

ISU halts use of dogs in life support training
POCATELLO, Idaho (AP) - Idaho State University says it will no
longer use live dogs in an Advanced Trauma Life Support class.

The class, offered yearly by the Idaho Committee on Trauma,
allowed medical personnel to practice tracheotomies and other
procedures on the dogs.

Four dogs were used for each class, and all
were animals from the Pocatello Animal Shelter already scheduled
for euthanasia.

They were anesthetized during the training and put
to sleep immediately afterward.

In a statement issued Friday, the school said the use of dogs
for such a course is approved by the American college of Surgeons
and that the program was in compliance with all national animal
care regulations.

But the school said the class, taught by ISU professor Alex Urfer, will use high-tech mannequins that simulate human functions in the future.

ISU decided to end the use of live dogs after the Physicians
Committee for Responsible Medicine brought attention to the course
in an article published in the Idaho State Journal.

The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine opposes the use of animals in medical training and research.