How Rodney Seiber slipped through law enforcement's cracks

How Rodney Seiber slipped through law enforcement's cracks »Play Video

BOISE, Idaho (KBOI) -  A man with felony charges of kidnapping and robbery and a history of escaping and running from police walks free for a while.

It happened after Rodney Seiber was transported from jail to the hospital for a medical condition. Law enforcement stopped watching him after he'd been admitted for a few days. So KBOI asked local law enforcement and St. Luke's how he got through the cracks.

Seiber has led police on several week, and sometimes even month long chases since the 1990's. Police say in his latest last fall, he's accused of holding up a Nampa store employee at gun point, then taking off in a stolen car and kidnapping his underage girlfriend and taking her to Montana.

Police say after he was caught in Montana, he was on his way back to the Canyon County Jail with a security team escaped during bathroom break at the Stage Stop. He was eventually caught and booked in the Ada County Jail.

But just a day after he was booked, he was taken to the hospital for what KBOI was told at the time was a life threatening medical condition.

The next time KBOI heard any word of Seiber was Thursday. He'd been arrested after someone made a disturbance call on him in Nampa, where he was out free.

KBOI called Ada County, and a spokesman said the jail released its custody of Seiber after he was in the hospital for a few days. Counties often do this so taxpayers don't have to pay inmates' medical bills.

KBOI asked why the county didn't still try to check up on Seiber.. We were told to call law enforcement in Canyon County, because that's where Seiber's charges of kidnapping and robbery were filed.  

Nampa Police officers say they made call after call to check up on Seiber, but were denied any information by St. Luke's.

"Patient privacy laws, I guess are something hospitals strive to protect and they cited HIPPA privacy laws," said Nampa Police Sergeant Joe Ramirez.

KBOI asked a spokesman for the hospital if HIPPA laws apply even when law enforcement needs to know about someone who's a public threat, and he said that there are no exceptions.

Ramirez says for Nampa Police, that just meant officers would have to wait until Seiber got into trouble again to get him back in custody.

Seiber was arraigned in court Friday and was given a $100,000 bond. His next court date is August 1st.