Otter left wondering how illegal migrant children came to Idaho

Otter left wondering how illegal migrant children came to Idaho
In this July 12, 2014, photo, migrants walk along the rail tracks after getting off a train during their journey toward the U.S.-Mexico border in Ixtepec, Mexico. The surge in unaccompanied minors and women with children migrating from Central America has put new attention on decades-old smuggling organizations. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

BOISE, Idaho (KBOI) -- Idaho is trying to figure out how eight illegal immigrant children were placed in homes here without the governor's office having any idea of it happening.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says eight illegal immigrant minors have been released into Idaho homes since the start of this year.

But Gov. Otter only found out about the children this week through media coverage, a spokesman told KBOI 2News. Now his office says he's left wondering why the feds never let him know they were bringing the children into our state.

Gov. Otter sent out a letter on Wednesday saying Idaho didn't want to take any illegal immigrant children. But that was before he found out that we already have eight here.

His office says he took that stand because he doesn't support the highly dangerous way these kids are getting into the United States.

As of now, the state has no idea where the children are or who they are with.

U.S. Sen. Mike Crapo said his office, too, did not know about the children. He released a statement to KBOI Friday afternoon.

"This current crisis illustrates the urgent need for comprehensive immigration reform, rather than through piecemeal executive order actions by the Administration. This massive influx of UACs will impose a huge financial burden on both the local infrastructure and U.S. taxpayers. Again, with our nation over $17 trillion in debt, President Obama's call for additional deficit spending is not the proper course of action."

"I recognize the difficult situation faced by these children.  The most responsible, humane course of action in this crisis would be to return the children safely to their country of origin and eliminate opportunities for their further exploitation."  

"Our existing immigration policies incentivize illegal migration, and increase migrants' willingness to pay traffickers and "coyotes" for help smuggling people-including children-into the U.S.  Ultimately, such policies directly contribute to the exploitation of migrants.  The President has the administrative capacity to take the steps necessary to enforce our law and return the UACs to their countries of origin.  This is the best way to stop the abuse of these children."