Idaho hockey fans file lawsuit over 'beergate' at CenturyLink

Idaho hockey fans file lawsuit over 'beergate' at CenturyLink

BOISE, Idaho (AP) - A handful of Idaho hockey fans sued a Boise arena on Tuesday, saying they were duped into thinking a $7 beer contains more brew than a $4 beer.

The lawsuit says CenturyLink Arena, home of the Idaho Steelheads hockey team, defrauded customers by charging $3 more for a tall, narrow cup advertised as a "large" that actually holds the same amount of beer as the shorter, wider cup described as a "small."

Arena spokesman Mike Campbell said he hadn't yet seen the lawsuit and can't comment.

Four fans filed the suit Tuesday in Boise's 4th District Court against Block 22 LLC, which does business as CenturyLink Arena. Brady Peck, Michele Bonds and William and Brittany Graham are seeking $10,000 in damages.

In the lawsuit, Peck says he's attended at least 30 events over the past three years at the arena, including a hockey game on March 5, and that he's purchased beer each time. The other three plaintiffs say they have been attending sporting events at the venue for five years and that they bought at least one large $7 beer at each event.

"While different shapes, both cup sizes hold substantially the same amount of liquid and are not large versus small in actual capacity," the group's attorney, Wyatt Johnson, wrote in the lawsuit. "Defendants knowingly sold each of their beers in a similar manner at each event held at the arena where beer was sold for at least the last five years."

The lawsuit came just two days after another hockey fan posted a video on YouTube of what the fan said was a beer purchased at CenturyLink Arena on March 8. That video shows a patron holding a large cup of beer and pouring it into an empty small cup. In both cups, the beer reaches nearly to the brim.

Gwen Gibbs and Heath Forsey, the folks featured in the YouTube video, who are not part of the lawsuit, told KBOI 2News they were happy with CenturyLink's response earlier in the week. | Read the Statement

"I just wanted a change and to make them realize they're kind of ripping people off," Gibbs said. "I'm really happy with the change and how fast they put it in place."

"They fixed it," Forsey said. "I'm not out to cause any problems or anything. (It's) kinda funny."