Residents react to Hobby Lobby court decision

Residents react to Hobby Lobby court decision »Play Video
BOISE, Idaho (KBOI) - Local residents on both side of the issue reacted to the Supreme Court's ruling that allows Hobby Lobby and other certain businesses to not pay for certain contraception for its workers.

Former Idaho Attorney General David Leroy said the ruling appeared to be very narrow to this case and not as sweeping as some believe it is. He notes that because an exception was made for religious organizations to not pay for contraception it gave reasons for this ruling.

"If you are going to give religious exception to churches then you must also give them to church practitioners who are even though in a corporation hold the same views."

Religious organizations were given exceptions from paying for parts of health insurance plans that cover contraception. They were given the pass because their beliefs are against birth control.

The courts ruling also notes this isn't necessarily applicable to all companies public or private. Only for what's known as closely held corporations which are run by a few people.

Residents in Boise said they were torn on the issue.

"I think that Hobby Lobby does have a right to believe in what they need to believe in, and they should be able to operate their business," said Maria Sermonia. "At the same time this decision has made it so that it opens a whole can of worms."

She later said she doesn't know why companies can pay for Viagra for men's health, and not cover contraception.

In a dissent by four of the Supreme Court justices they said they worry this could be a slippery slope and that it's possible that companies could deny certain labor and civil rights laws because of their religious beliefs.

Leroy points out that the courts ruling was very narrow towards this case and based off it's facts alone.

The Supreme Court noted that the fix to this issue could be for the government to cover the birth control not covered by certain employers. The same thing which is granted to people who work for religious organizations that opt out.