Giant egg mysteriously appears on Wash. farm

Giant egg mysteriously appears on Wash. farm
SNOHOMISH, Wash. -- When the big bright blob first poked a hole in the horizon Monday morning, longtime farmer Darrell Ricci didn't know what it could be. An errant bale of hay, maybe; a fallen weather balloon, perhaps. Heck, he thought, it might even be squatters, camping in a tent. Wouldn't be the first time on the farm.

But as the sun rose on Ricci's Snohomish pastures this week, it quickly became clear that the giant yellow orb was no lost hot air balloon, no enormous child's toy.

This, Ricci knew, was something different.

"(I thought), 'Man, how did this yellow egg get out in the middle of the field? Where's the bird at?'" he said, laughing. "No tire tracks, nothing. No sign of anything. (it was) just out in the grass field."

"I figure it's going to hatch on Easter," he joked.

The four-foot-by-six-foot egg - the color of, well, yolks - appeared on Ricci's farm with nary a trace. No note, no clues, no giant bird footprints leading into the woods. After his family figured the egg was harmless, they decided to have fun with it. They snapped photos - and, well, 'cracked' jokes.

"We do have chickens, yeah," laughed Darrell's son, Brock. "I think they'd be afraid of (the egg) if they saw it."

"It's the golden egg!" quipped his dad.

If a goose did, in fact, lay this golden egg, then it's anybody's guess who's been moving it on a nightly basis. On the first night, some stood it upright against a power pole. The second night, it moved to the other side of the highway (perhaps answering the age-old question of why the chicken crossed the road).

"I found out Big Bird is a male," joked Brock, "so, Big Bird's mate must be down there somewhere."

The giant egg moved again Thursday night, but then an even stranger thing happened: a bright yellow, normal-sized twin appeared in the farm's mailbox.

The family has been chronicling the egg's story on Facebook, while trying to solve the mystery. It shouldn't be tough, they figure, considering they used to be a dairy farm.

"There's going to be a story behind it," Brock added. "We've not been able to catch 'em doing it, but I'm sure they're getting a chuckle out of it."